Genevieve Walker

Contributing Editor

Genevieve Walker is a writer based in Brooklyn, New York. She writes nonfiction, criticism, essays (poetry and some fiction) about photography, eating, cities, and women who work with their hands. She's written for Bon Appétit, Real Life, GQ, The Brooklyn Quarterly, The Pitchfork Review, Guernica, and others. Previously she led web editorial operations for the Players' Tribune, and before that, GQ, and before that, Vanity Fair.

This is a story, Photo by Kate Edwards

A Poem About a Day, Musings on Perception

Does my experience of a thing have distinct characteristics, does it tap an essence universally understood? The taste of red wine, that is a typical example of qualia. What is the taste of red wine?

The Complexity of Simplicity: Aesthetic Culture

The Complexity of Simplicity: Aesthetic Culture

Basic, simple, minimal, elegant—behind these catalogue descriptors is a culture in retreat. Too many choices, too much opportunity, too much pressure to create individuality through style has led to a trend of minimalist fashion. Marni Chan takes apart the stark aesthetics of contemporary dress to reveal the social discomfort born from abundance.

Minimalism as Restraint

Minimalism as Restraint

While a tenet of minimalist philosophy is awareness—the removal of all but the essential in order to fully appreciate an object, a food, a garment—this makes its opposite equally true. Minimalism is a throttle on pleasure, a restriction of life. A spiritual starvation. Jessica Gross examines two sides of the minimalist approach.

Simple Gestures: Saying Sorry

Simple Gestures: Saying Sorry

What is minimalism in the context of a relationship? Can the phrase “I’m sorry” be delivered without associations, expectations, and interpretations overwhelming its intent? Sarah Gerard explores the complex process of offering a simple apology.